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July 12, 2021

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Workplace fatality figures

Workplace fatality figures released for 2020/21

Provisional data shows that a total of 142 workers were killed at work in Great Britain in 2020/21, an increase of 29 from the previous year, though the number of deaths in 2019/20 (113) was low compared to other recent years.

In statistical terms the number of fatalities has remained broadly level in recent years – the average annual number of workers killed at work over the five years 2016/17-2020/21 is 136.

Over the past 20 years there has been a long-term reduction in the number of workplace fatalities, demonstrating that Great Britain is one of the safest places to work in the world.

The figures released by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) relate to workplace incidents. They do not include deaths arising from occupational exposure to disease, including COVID-19.

Sarah AlbonHSE’s Chief Executive, Sarah Albon, said: “The working world in which we now live has created new health challenges for workers and for those who have a duty towards them, safety must also remain a priority.

“Whilst the picture has improved considerably over the longer term and Great Britain is one of the safest places to work in the world, every loss of life is a tragedy, we are committed to ensuring that workplaces are as safe as they can be and that employers are held to account and take their obligations seriously.”

The three most common causes of fatal injuries continue to be:

  • Workers falling from height (35).
  • Being struck by a moving vehicle (25), and
  • Being struck by a moving object (17).

Those three causes of death account for more than half of fatalities in 2020/21.

These figures also continue to highlight the risks to older workers with around 30% of fatal injuries in 2020/21 involving workers aged 60 or over, even though such workers only make up around 11% of the workforce.

In addition, members of the public continue to be killed in connection with work-related incidents. In 2020/21, 60 members of the public were killed as a result of a work-related incident.

The figures for Mesothelioma, which is a cancer contracted through past exposure to asbestos and is one of the few work-related diseases where deaths can be counted directly, show 2,369 people died in Great Britain in 2019. This is 7% lower than the average of 2,540 deaths over the previous seven years.

Current mesothelioma deaths largely reflect occupational asbestos exposures that occurred before the 1980s. The figure for 2019 is consistent with projections that a reduction in total annual deaths would start to become apparent at this point. However, it is still not certain how quickly annual deaths will decline.

A fuller assessment of work-related ill-health and injuries, drawing on HSE’s full range of data sources, will be provided as part of the annual Health and Safety Statistics release on 16 December 2021.

Click here to see the Health and Safety Executive’s report.

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Paul C
Paul C
3 months ago

I am a little surprised that the rate has increased, especially because, I assume in any case, the number of hours worked over the past year must be noticeably less. This surely must mean that the incidence rate is therefore higher and actually a worse picture than portrayed in the article.

phil mclarnon
phil mclarnon
3 months ago
Reply to  Paul C

well said Paul

Nigel Dupree
Nigel Dupree
3 months ago

Does that data expediently not include the less tangible work-stress fatigue and mental health related causes work-deaths linked to presenteeism ?

https://www.shponline.co.uk/culture-and-behaviours/long-working-hours-745000-deaths-are-the-tip-of-the-iceberg/