Journalist, SHP Online

January 15, 2017

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Video: Mindfulness in construction

Created by former builders, a new training programme has been developed by BS2B and Olive Media, which uses captivating animations to show users how their thoughts affect their ability to work effectively. In this mindfulness in construction animation, machine driver Baz and pipe-layer James end up in conflict over Baz’s failure to follow James’s instructions. Investigation of Baz’s thoughts find they were on everything but the job in hand, which led him to make the mistakes he did. An explanation then follows to show how a mindful approach to the work would have produced a different outcome.

Created by Dave Lee, author of  The Hairy Arsed Builder’s Guide to Stress Management the animations aim to show the impact the environment can have on workers. “Often the connection between health, and physical hazards such as noise, dust, chemicals and vibration, are well recognised, but less well understood is the stress created by the working environment and the impact this has on inner wellbeing,” explains Dave. “When staff feel angry, frustrated and emotionally drained, the effects on their work can be serious, leading to costly mistakes, accidents and, in the most extreme cases, death.”

Find out more about the training programme here.

Hear Jonny Wilkinson share his mental health struggles

We all know Jonny Wilkinson for his exploits on the rugby pitch. But what you might not know is that he has long struggled with his mental health and wellbeing, dealing with depression, anxiety and panic attacks.

In his honest, unguarded speech, entitled ‘Success on the field and mental health: a personal account of understanding what matters’, Jonny will recount how his focus and dedication to the sport he loves meant overlooking important parts of his life.

Learn more about the exciting inspirational speakers exclusive to Safety & Health Expo 2019 | ExCeL London | Thursday 18 June | 11:30 - 12:30

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Steven
Steven

Very interesting, thanks. The connection between emotional wellness and safety should not be overlooked.

lw
lw

Excellent, when you think of the machinery that is used, the depths and heights worked and how important being in the moment is for safety. More, more, more mindfulness training please.

Duncan Brown
Duncan Brown

If you are interested in stress & health in construction issues you will be interested in these free to view videos too
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XiXUf58I0EU & https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nn8q-4dxwHk

Samba
Samba

Hello,
How can download these videos?
Sam

MS
MS

A very interesting and informative video. Not necessarily related to Occupational Health, specifically mental health, however. The video is showing classic psychological traits that affect human behaviours, (otherwise known as conscious overload) which impacts on safety. It is just scratching the surface however. It is pointing out the problem but not offering any solution, such as behavioural safety tools that people can use to compensate for those psychological failings that are common to us all and which lead us into making the mistakes that have negative safety impact.

Paddy Dwan
Paddy Dwan

Very good. Short and sweet and to the point. Highlights a problem that is not just confined to construction but also applies to other jobs. No harm in drawing attention to it. I am sure most people can recall moments when their full attention was not always on ‘being in the moment’. It’s human but we still have to be very aware and in the moment for our own well being and the safety of others.

Andrew
Andrew

The video is a helpful explanation as to what can go wrong and why it happens, but doesn’t offer any solution on how to stay in the ‘now’
Regards
Andy