Editor, Safety & Health Practitioner

Author Bio ▼

Ian joined Informa (formerly UBM) in 2018 as the Editor of Safety & Health Practitioner. Ian studied journalism at university before spending seven years in online fantasy gaming. Prior to moving to Informa, Ian worked in business to business trade print media, in the automotive sector. He was Online Editor and then moved on to be the Editor of two publications aimed at independent automotive technicians and parts distributors.
July 1, 2020

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Mental Health

Mental health in the workplace

One in four people in the UK will experience a mental health problem at some point in their lifetime. This page compiles a host of useful content and resources which should help to tackle Mental health in the workplace.

Mental-Health

What is mental health?

Being mentally healthy doesn’t just mean that you don’t have a mental health problem, according to the Mental Health Foundation. It says that those who are in good mental heath are able to make the most of their potential, cope with life and play a full part in their family, workplace, community and among friends.

Mental health, sometimes referred to as ‘emotional health’ or ‘wellbeing’ can be just as important as good physical health. Mental health is about how we think, feel and behave. Anxiety and depression are the most common mental health problems. They are often a reaction to a difficult life event, such as bereavement, but can also be caused by work-related issues.

Most people will go through times when they feel low, stressed or frightened and for most people, those feelings will pass. However, on some occasions they can develop into a more serious problem and it can happen to any one of us.

A person’s mental health will change as s circumstances change and as a person moves through different stages of their life.

The Mental Health Foundation says: “There’s a stigma attached to mental health problems. This means that people feel uncomfortable about them and don’t talk about them much. Many people don’t even feel comfortable talking about their feelings. But it’s healthy to know and say how you’re feeling.”

According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 264 million people suffer from depression globally. It says that ‘Work is good for mental health but a negative working environment can lead to physical and mental health problems’, and that ‘harassment and bullying at work are commonly reported problems, and can have a substantial adverse impact on mental health.’

The World Health Organization website contains information on Work-related risk factors for health, Creating a healthy workplace and Supporting people with mental disorders at work

The Health & Safety Executive (HSE) says that: “Work can also aggravate pre-existing conditions, and problems at work can bring on symptoms or make their effects worse.

“Whether work is causing the health issue or aggravating it, employers have a legal responsibility to help their employees. Work-related mental health issues must to be assessed to measure the levels of risk to staff. Where a risk is identified, steps must be taken to remove it or reduce it as far as reasonably practicable.

“Some employees will have a pre-existing physical or mental health condition when recruited or may develop one caused by factors that are not work-related factors.

“Employers may have further legal requirements, to make reasonable adjustments under equalities legislation.”

GOV.UK contains all of the relevant information about employing people with a mental or physical disability. Further information can be found from the Equality and Human Rights Commission in EnglandScotland and Wales.

There is advice for line managers to help them support their employees with mental health conditions.

The ‘Thriving at Work’ review

This report, written in 2017 by Lord Stevenson and Paul Farmer (Chief Executive of Mind) was produced on behalf of the government to independently review the role employers can play to better support individuals with mental health conditions in the workplace.

It sets out a framework of ‘core standards’ that employers of all sizes are recommended to follow and put in place within their organisation.

In 2019, Safer Highways launched the first industry benchmarking exercise against the Thriving at Work standards for across the highways sector.

Mental health in the workplace statistics UK 2019

According to Mental Health and Work, a report from the Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1 in 6.8 people (around 14%) experience mental health problems in the workplace.

It is also reported by Mental Health Foundation, that nearly 20% of women in fulltime employment suffer from common mental health problem as opposed to just over 10% of full-time employed men.

Mental Health Foundation suggests that around £8 billion per year could be saved by UK business, by incorporating better support of mental health in the workplace.

Click here for the HSE’s annual statistics on work-related stress, depression and anxiety in 2018/19.

Mental health in the workplace UK law

All employers have a general duty to look after the welfare of employees under the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and to assess and manage risk to their staff under Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999.

This includes assessing and minimising the risk of stress-related illness.

The Equality Act 2010 makes it unlawful to discriminate against employees because of a mental or physical disability.

A mental health issue can be considered a disability under the law if all of the following apply:

  • It has a ‘substantial adverse effect’ on the life of an employee (for example, they regularly cannot focus on a task, or it takes them longer to do);
  • It lasts at least 12 months, or is expected to;
  • It affects their ability to do their normal day-to-day activities (for example, interacting with people, following instructions or keeping to set working times).

Mental health in the workplace: Taking care of your employees

Research carried out by Mental health charity, Mind, discovered that:

  • Over one in five people (21%) said they had called in sick to avoid work because of workplace stress;
  • 14% said they quit their job and 42% has thought about quitting due to workplace stress;
  • 30% disagreed with the statement ‘I would feel able to talk openly with my line manager if I was feeling stressed’;
  • 56% of employers said they would like to do more to improve staff wellbeing but don’t feel they have the right training or guidance.

Mind has put together a series of free resources to help employers take care of business.

It also offers a series of training courses and wellbeing booklets.

Mind is official Charity Partner of the Workplace Wellbeing Show.

Mental Health First Aid regulation changes

In November 2019, HSE announced a change to the first aid guidance to include suitable and sufficient mental health training.

According to the guidance, this could include providing information or training for managers and employees, employing occupational health professionals, appointing mental health-trained first aiders and implementing employee support programmes.

Heather Beach, Founder and Managing Director of The Healthy Work Company, says that “Whilst the guidance does not mention the MHFA courses specifically, it does say ‘you might decide that it will be beneficial to have personnel trained to identify and understand symptoms and able to support someone who might be experiencing a mental health issue’.”

Research study on Mental Health First Aid in business launched

The Centre for Mental Health and London South Bank University announced in April 2020 that they are embarking on a study of Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) England training in UK workplaces.

Set to last for three years, the Mental Health First Aid England funded study brings together a group of leading Industry experts chaired by Lord Kamlesh Patel. Its aim is to test out the impact of MHFA England training over the long-term in a range of workplaces across the country.

To find out more about the MHFA training study, click here.

3 ways to a mental health and wellbeing strategy

In the not too distant past, a wellbeing strategy looked like apples in the office, yoga at lunchtime, a cycle to work scheme and gym memberships. Generally, this was run by HR. More recently, due to a culture change in the UK regarding the importance of mental health, some proactive work from Mental Health First Aid England and some senior leaders in health and safety, MHFA joined the suite of wellbeing services any right thinking organisation would offer.

Heather Beach, Founder and Managing Director of The Healthy Work Company, says the three ways to a successful health and wellbeing strategy are:

  1. The top down strategic approach;
  2. A mental health training and awareness strategy only;
  3. Iterative approach.

Mental health: the costs to employees and businesses

financeMental health can affect how we feel, think and behave and, in some cases, seriously limit our ability to cope with relationships, work and life in general.

In the workplace, mental health issues can have a serious impact on both the morale of employees, those suffering from mental health issues and their colleagues who then pick up the additional workload.

It can also impact an organisation’s productivity and profitability through overtime costs, recruitment of temporary or permanent cover – According to the Centre for Mental Health, the financial cost to British business of mental ill-health is an estimated £26 billion per annum, because of absence from work due to mental health issues.

Mental health issues can appear as the result of experiences in both our personal and working lives, or like a physical illness, can just happen. Commonly diagnosed mental health issues include:

  • Depression, anxiety and panic attacks;
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder;
  • Phobias;
  • Bipolar disorder;
  • Schizophrenia;
  • Borderline personality disorder.

The Health & Safety Executive’s draft ‘Health and Work strategy: Work-related stress’ identifies that 1.5% of the working population suffers from mental health issues, resulting in 11.7 million working days lost in 2015/16 (23.9 days/case).

Compare this to self-reported injuries – 4.9M working days lost (7.2 days/case) – and the scale of workplace mental ill-health is almost two and a half times the physical impact of unsafe workplaces and working practices.

Cost to business

Providing support for employees is important for your organisation as well as for the individual concerned.

As well as financial savings, the benefits of such investment for your organisation include:

  • Reducing the costs of lost productivity due to absenteeism;
  • Retaining valued and experienced members of staff – and thus avoiding unnecessary recruitment and training costs;
  • Reducing the cost of sickness absence payments;
  • Meeting your duty of care and legislative obligations;
  • Identifying and managing mental health in the workplace.

One-in-four people will experience a mental health problem in any year. A common misconception is that mental health problems are only caused by ‘home’ issues, so some employers can feel that it’s not appropriate, or their responsibility, to intervene and provide support to employees.

It is more common that the cause of an employee’s mental health problems are a combination of issues relating to both their work and private lives.

A simple example would be an employee suffering from anxiety due to high personal debt, which as well as impacting on their private life may result in the demands of their job now becoming impossible for them to cope with.

Likewise, someone under prolonged work-related stress may find it difficult to enjoy life outside of work, due to working excessive hours or drinking as a way of coping, which in turn has a negative impact on their family and/or personal relationships.

We can also be affected if those close to us experience mental health problems. Mental health problems can affect our physical and mental wellbeing, and may include visible signs (shaking), psychological symptoms (exhaustion) or a combination of both.

It is not uncommon for someone to mask both physical and psychological symptoms to the degree that no one close to them is aware. It’s important to remember that no two people respond or cope in the same way; men are less likely to seek help or talk to family and friends due to historical taboos relating to demonstrating weakness to peers.

A successful approach for organisations to work with their employees to encourage awareness, challenge preconceptions to change the approach and reaction to mental health.

Our approach is always proportional to the type of business, along with the size of an organisation. It may not be reasonable to expect a small employer to provide access to counselling, whereas as large employer may be able to do so.

However, regardless of the size of an organisation the first step is being able to communicate about mental health. This could be through:

  • Delivering mental health awareness training to management teams, with the result of improved employee performance due to a change in manager’s attitude;
  • Analysis of responses to confidential awareness surveys and comparison of absence statistics to inform organisations of the potential scale of mental health issues within their workplace;
  • Developing appropriate policies covering the range of mental health issues likely to occur in the workplace amongst both management and employees, and which makes mental health well-being a priority equal to accident and loss prevention.

All employers can minimise the impact of mental health issues amongst employees, by:

  • Introduction of ‘Wellness Recovery Action Plans’ to support the return to work of employees absent due to mental health issues so that they understand their welfare is as important as their return to work;
  • Developing open two-way communication to minimise uncertainty, and when established working ways are being changed, through tool box talks and mental health awareness moments for meetings;
  • Providing telephone helpline numbers for (i.e. Citizens Advice, The Samaritans and Mind) on noticeboards, newsletters and in payslips.

Finally, it should be noted that people with mental health issues are automatically protected under the disability strand of the Equality Act 2010 twelve months on from the point of diagnosis.

This legislation puts a duty on all employers to make ‘reasonable adjustments’ in the workplace for employees with disabilities – whether they be physical adjustments or management solutions.

Work-related stress

Work-related stress is defined as “a harmful reaction people have to undue pressures and demands in the workplace”.

Workplace mental health issues are often associated with stress. Exposure to high levels of stress at work can cause emotional symptoms such as depression, tearfulness, withdrawal, mood swings, loss of motivation or concentration and behavioural changes such as smoking, drinking, drugs, changes to eating or sleeping habits and nervous behaviour.

Poor employee mental health arising from stress can cost your business time and money in lost productivity and sickness absence.

Time to talk day

On Time to Talk Day 2020 organisations were encouraged to support colleagues who may be experiencing a mental ill-health issue in the workplace.

Mind Matters

In 2019, SHP and The Healthy Work Company will be published a series of videos entitled Mind Matters, featuring people speaking candidly about their personal experiences with mental ill health.

The series featured topics such as:

Mental health guidance for employers

Knowing what you can do as an employer to tackle work-related mental health issues can be tough. The HSE has produced Management Standards for Work Related Stress to help.

This sets out six key areas to look at:

  1. Demand. Workload, work patterns and work environment;
  2. Control. An employee’s say in how they do their job;
  3. Support. Encouragement and resource provision;
  4. Relationships. Promoting positive working and avoiding conflict e.g. bullying/harassment;
  5. Role. Helping employees understand their role and responsibilities;
  6. Change. Management and communication of change.

Practical advice for your workplace

  • Demonstrate good practice. Use a step-by-step risk assessment to assess your workplace;
  • Promote discussion. Promote working in partnership with employees to decide on practical improvements;
  • Focus on underlying causes. Help employees to get to the root cause of stress in the workplace.

workplace wellbeing showWorkplace Wellbeing Show

As more businesses search for solutions, guidance and expertise surrounding the increasing challenges of workplace wellbeing and mental health, HR and wellbeing professionals will come together at the Workplace Wellbeing Show 2021, which takes place from 18-20 May at ExCeL, London.

Alongside official charity parter Mind, the Workplace Wellbeing Show will being a wide-range of live content and interactive sessions on stress, mental ill-health and wellbeing.

Click here to secure your free ticket to Workplace Wellbeing Show.

Work-related stress and mental health in the workplace resources:

 

Latest mental health articles

5 tips avoid burnout out whilst working from home

As the government announces its latest set of guidance encouraging workers back home and away from the office, staff burnout has become a very real prospect and one in which employers are now keen to avoid during their transition to a remote working model.

Lighthouse Charity offers free wellbeing training for construction industry

As a direct result of the wellbeing issues presented to its 24/7 Construction Industry Helpline, the Lighthouse Construction Industry Charity has announced that it will deliver £20,000 of free mental health and wellbeing training to the industry for the remainder of 2020.

A guide to home working

Many businesses have begun to embrace the idea of flexible working and working from home and, in the current climate, more and more of us may find ourselves plunged into doing so for longer than the one to two days a week, which employers and employees adapt to fairly easily.

‘Watch out for burnout!’, ex-Olympian Rebecca Adlington draws parallels between business and elite sport

Former swimmer and double Olympic gold medallist Rebecca Adlington OBE compares burnout in the workplace to the experience of elite athletes.

What makes us susceptible to burnout?

In episode 2 of the Safety & Health Podcast, ‘Burnout, stress and being human’, Heather Beach is joined by Stacy Thomson to discuss burnout, perfectionism and how to deal with burnout as an individual, as management and as an organisation.

Schizophrenia and employment: How do you manage a schizophrenic employee?

A personal story about a battle with Schizophrenia and employment and some advice for how employers can support a schizophrenic employee.

55% of UK workers cannot access, or are unaware of mental health support at work

A poll with a cross section of workers from across the UK, has found that more than half have no access to mental health support at work, or don’t know if their business has policies to support workers with mental illness.

Mind responds to ‘huge demand’ for information about how to cope with your mental health during coronavirus

Mental health charity Mind recently held an invite-only digital event, which SHP was proud to host and support. During the event Mind’s President, Stephen Fry, spoke about his own mental health during the coronavirus pandemic and CEO Paul Famer discussed Mind’s work and plans for the future.

SHP launches Safety & Health Podcast

That’s why SHP has launched the Safety & Health Podcast to deliver the news, insights and legislation through interviews, discussions and panel debates with some of the profession’s leaders, influencers and innovators. Episode 1 features an exclusive interview with SHP readers’ Most Influential Person in Health & Safety, Thames Water’s Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer, Karl Simons.

Supporting employees suffering from grief

With mental health being traditionally looked at in the workplace setting, what about the return to work of those grieving, who have suffered loss? In this article, two people who understand the grieving process, share some insights and useful resources for employers.

Supporting the mental health of your workforce during the pandemic

Lynn Willacy, Employee Engagement Ambassador at Air Products, talks about the most common challenges faced by staff and shares her advice for providing support during this difficult time.

Lighthouse Construction Industry Charity joins forces with Safer Highways to tackle Mental Health

The Lighthouse Construction Industry Charity and Building Mental Health have joined forces with Safer Highways in what the organisations have described as ‘collaborative thinking on mental wellbeing’.

Coronavirus ‘second wave’ feared as leading threat to business continuity

70% of companies’ primary business continuity concern is further disruption from a second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, whilst 16% of organisations said that employee mental health issues were affecting the performance of their business, according to a recent survey.

Navigating the coronavirus pandemic: What does psychological research into wellbeing tell us?

As part of Workplace Wellbeing Digital Week last month, Workplace Wellbeing Show hosted a live and interactive webinar, with a panel consisting of Faye McGuinness, Head of Workplace Wellbeing Programmes (Strategy and Development), Mind, Jan Golding, CEO, Roots, Teresa Higgins, Brand Director, Barbour EHS and Ivan Robertson, Founding Director, Robertson Cooper Ltd. Here, SHP puts your questions to Ivan Robertson.

British Safety Council launches Live Online, a series of digital mental health workshops

The British Safety Council has launched a selection of its mental health workshops online for those looking to better address employee mental wellbeing, as workplaces across the country adjust their practices to prevent the further spread of coronavirus.

Multiplex – Protecting the mental health of employees during COVID-19

In this article, we hear from Martin Wilshire, Health & Safety Director at Multiplex, about how the firm has had to act quickly and responsibly to ensure it is following the government’s guidance on how businesses and employers can help to limit the spread of the virus.

Mental ill-health in UK workplaces

It really pays off to invest in your staff’s mental health. Research suggests that for every £1 you invest into employee mental health, you’ll receive an average of £4.20 in return!

Mentor remains on hand to help businesses meet HSE guidelines for vital MHE training

In line with the HSE’s recent statement that basic lift truck training remains essential during the coronavirus pandemic, Mentor FLT Training is offering a number of materials and courses to help businesses stay safe and compliant during this critical time.

Almost 1 in 4 Britons report a positive improvement in mental health during lockdown

Launched during Mental Health Awareness Week, a recent survey looks at the nation’s mental health during the coronavirus lockdown.

Occupational health and safety in the home

Around 8.7 million people said that they worked from home in 2019 – less than 30% of the UK workforce – according to a survey by the Office for National Statistics. The same survey also reported that only 1.7 million regularly worked from home.

Mates in Mind calls on employers to act now to support long-term mental wellbeing during pandemic

Following the release of data exploring the significant impact that the COVID-19 pandemic is having on the mental health of the public and calls from experts and charities to research the long-term impact of the crisis.

Digital humanity and its effects on employee health

A look at how technology is bringing people together during this time of remote living and working, and social distancing. This article highlights the ways in which technology is being used to connect with humans – and the benefits for employee health.

20 things about absence and health in 20 years

After 20 years of Health and wellbeing at work surveys, the CIPD has reflected on what has changed – and what’s stayed the same – over the years…

Supporting mental, social, financial and physical wellbeing of staff

Gone are the days when people bought an insurance policy and left it on the shelf to gather dust. Nowadays, whether it’s car insurance, home insurance, employer liability or an employee benefits package, there’ll be a raft of extra services included which complement the core insurance because employers and consumers look for daily value from these products rather than a “just in case” prudence purchase.

Research study on Mental Health First Aid in business launched

The Centre for Mental Health and London South Bank University are embarking on a ground-breaking study of Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) England training in UK workplaces.

Webinar: Mental health & wellbeing and looking after remote workers

Catch up with our most recent webinar, which looked at health & wellbeing in the workplace. With many employers advising staff work from home during the coronavirus outbreak, it also covered how period of self-isolation or prolonged time working from home can affect health & wellbeing and require a different approach from managers.

A pandemic within a pandemic?

The fear pandemic is something that each of us has to manage – anxiety loves the words ‘what if’ – so how can you manage your head and overcome your feelings when they are overwhelming and how can you help others who may be struggling too?

Nicola Hodkinson of Seddon joins the Mates in Mind Board of Trustees

Mates in Mind has appointed Nicola Hodkinson, Business Services Director at Seddon, as a Trustee Board Member.

Updating your wellbeing business case for 2020

Heather Beach looks at two reports, published to support your business case for organisational wellbeing – one from Deloitte and one from Robertson Cooper.

Counselling for officers should do more to prevent mental health issues, says former prison officer

In 2019, almost 2,000 prison officers took absences from work in England and Wales, as a result of their mental health and pressures from work.

Workplace Wellbeing Show announces Mind as official Charity Partner

Workplace Wellbeing Show, hosted by Informa Markets, is delighted to announce Mind, the leading mental health charity, as its official Charity Partner.

Supporting the mental health of child sexual abuse investigators

Over the past few years there has been a growing discussion around mental health in law enforcement, primarily focused on the need for law enforcement to be trained to better deal with and support members of the public with mental health issues – but what about training others to better support the police with their own mental health?

Time to Talk: Mates in Mind supports managers to transform mental health at work

Mates in Mind is raising awareness about mental ill-health at work by supporting managers across the UK in tackling the issue, to mark Time to Talk Day.

Time to Talk Day: Get your workplace talking

To mark Time to Talk Day 2020, and on the back of the release of the HSE’s annual statistics on work-related stress, depression and anxiety in 2018/19, organisations are being encouraged to support colleagues who may be experiencing a mental ill-health issue in the workplace.

‘Mental health issues are the most common excuse for National Sickie Day’

ELAS, a business support service provider, coined ‘National Sickie Day’ after noticing an increased trend for absences on the first Monday of February, by its absence management team nearly 10 years ago. Other businesses in the UK  found a similar trend within their organisations of employees also taking an unexplained sick day.

National Access and Scaffolding Confederation fund training for mental health first aiders

As a solution to tackle down the stigma around mental health in the scaffolding industry, £30,000 has been funded by the National Access and Scaffolding Confederation (NASC), to train mental health  250 first aiders.

Getting your workforce through Blue Monday

As Christmas and New Year celebrations come to an end, many will be feeling the effects of gloomy weather, shorter days, and the debt they’ve run up after the festive break. It’s well known that the third Monday in January is dubbed ‘Blue Monday’, so what can businesses do to boost morale in the workplace and help employees to get through the post-Christmas slump?

Blue Monday: ‘77% of employees consider themselves stressed at work’

iHASCO is encouraging all UK organisations to break the stigma surrounding mental ill-health with its Mental Health Awareness course.

CIOB launches anti-anxiety service for its members

Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) has launched a new service aimed at supporting members suffering from anxiety, stress, or anxiety-based depression.

Manufacturing industry investing in workforce health and wellbeing with 90% of companies rewarded with productivity boost

Wellbeing is now part of the core commitment of manufacturers to their staff – 85% see it as their duty to encourage and promote physical and mental wellbeing.

UK Water Industry releases position on Mental Health through ‘Thriving at Work’ survey results

Analysis shows that 87% of the Water Industry have achieved compliance against the core standards and 68% have gone further and achieved compliance against both the core and enhanced standards.

January Blues: SHP’s guide to helping workers beat the winter slump

The first few weeks of January are often perceived as a challenging time for the workforce from a mental wellbeing perspective.

Free Mental Health First Aid training for new research project

Researchers invite all companies in the UK to apply for free Mental Health First Aid England training, for a new research project starting 2020, to investigate the effectiveness of mental health first aid training when used on employees.

Thriving at Work mental health survey results released

Highways sector comes together at House of Lords to hear results of the Thriving at Work Mental Health survey.

Burnout, stress and being human

In May 2019, the World Health Organization announced that in the ICD11 (international classification of mental illnesses) there would be a new category of “burnout” as an occupational phenomenon – not a medical condition. Heather Beach discusses…

Mental health strategy wins Thames Water top award

Thames Water’s work to support its employees with their mental health has been recognised with a national award.

‘You have to get your most senior leaders opening up and talking about mental health’

SHP speaks to Global VP Health, Safety & Environment at Sodexo, Alastair Davey about implementing a successful health & safety culture in a large organisation and how to introduce impactful health programmes.

Road Safety Week: Mates in Mind says suicide rate in transport sector is ‘above average’

Mates in Mind is campaigning for transport and logistics organisations to prioritise the mental wellbeing of their workforces.

Wales Health at Work Partnership launched

Wellbeing and mental health and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are two of the biggest health issues for Wales’ work culture. They were the main topics that were explored at the Wales Health at Work Summit, which was held at Llandudno on 10 October 2019. 

World Mental Health Day: Prevention is the best cure

British Safety Council has urged employers to safeguard employee mental health and invest in workplace wellbeing.

Suicide hotlines

A list of trusted suicide prevention resources that we encourage you share around your colleagues and workplace.

MPs get behind improving workplace mental health

Party conferences see groundswell of political support for the 500 employers pledging to take transformative action on workplace mental health.

Learning mental health

Building on a recent article on suicides in construction Dr Nick Bell examines some common themes and lessons that can be applied by any organisation.

Report reveals 39% of employees have mental health issues as a result of work

BITC created a call to action for employers on how to deal with employees with mental health issues, after report revealed 39% are suffering from it.

Talking to a suicidal employee can save their life

Employees and employers could potentially prevent their colleague from committing suicide, by simply engaging in an open conversation about it with them.

How biophilic design can transform workspaces forever

Biophilic office designs introduces more natural light and incorporates live plants into a space, natural matrial like wood to increase workplace wellbeing.

Understanding suicide in construction

A recent Guardian report into suicides at the Hinkley Point C project is a call-for-action. Dr Nick Bell discusses the wider implications for the construction industry.

Hot desking advantages and disadvantages

The nervousness around the hot desking trend has led people to question the advantages and disadvantages of it as “hot desk anxiety” is popular search term.

How to stop drug and alcohol abuse in the workplace

Samantha Francis, Training Consultant at SYNLAB, explains the current trends within illegal drug use, and what businesses need to do to prevent it.

Where is the mental health agenda heading?

The changing mental health agenda of 2019 is driven by cultural change and leadership, according to a panel discussion held at Safety & Health Expo 2019’s Workplace Wellbeing Theatre. ‘Businesses need to look carefully at their current wellbeing strategies to determine what is and isn’t working’.

Get your free ticket to Workplace Wellbeing Show

Search for solutions, guidance and expertise surrounding the critical issue of mental and physical health in the workplace, and join HR and wellbeing professionals at Workplace Wellbeing Show, taking place from 18–20 May 2021 at ExCeL, London.

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stuart Gibbon
stuart Gibbon
2 years ago

Whilst there is a huge plethora of good information on the internet regarding Mental Health & Well-being and what to do to reduce and assist with it , i feel that H&S legislation is falling short on enforcing employers to safe guard employees mental health. It’s ok that section 2 of the HASAWA states that it is the employers duty to safeguard the Health safety & well-being of their employees whilst at work, but why cant we encompass Mental Health First Aid into the standard First Aid at Work Regulations, whereby, based on the risk, diversity and size of an… Read more »

David Whiting
David Whiting
2 years ago
Reply to  stuart Gibbon

Hi Stuart, You make a good point. We have started in my company to introduce trained Mental First Aiders (MFA). To introduce MFA will require a well thought out strategy as it goes to the very heart of how do we do business. Many Health and Safety people see this as an extra task to have to do. For as long as I have been in practice (many years) it has never been at the front of our agenda, but with the means of popular media attention and AI and modern technology. Could be another means to get underneath the… Read more »