Editor, SHP

Author Bio ▼

Ian joined Informa (formerly UBM) in 2018 as the Editor of SHP. Ian studied journalism at university before spending seven years in online fantasy gaming. Prior to moving to Informa, Ian worked in business to business trade print media, in the automotive sector. He was Online Editor and then moved on to be the Editor of two publications aimed at independent automotive technicians and parts distributors.
July 1, 2020

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Mental Health

Mental health in the workplace

One in four people in the UK will experience a mental health problem at some point in their lifetime. This page compiles a host of useful content and resources which should help to tackle Mental health in the workplace.

Mental-Health

What is mental health?

Being mentally healthy doesn’t just mean that you don’t have a mental health problem, according to the Mental Health Foundation. It says that those who are in good mental heath are able to make the most of their potential, cope with life and play a full part in their family, workplace, community and among friends.

Mental health, sometimes referred to as ‘emotional health’ or ‘wellbeing’ can be just as important as good physical health. Mental health is about how we think, feel and behave. Anxiety and depression are the most common mental health problems. They are often a reaction to a difficult life event, such as bereavement, but can also be caused by work-related issues.

Most people will go through times when they feel low, stressed or frightened and for most people, those feelings will pass. However, on some occasions they can develop into a more serious problem and it can happen to any one of us.

A person’s mental health will change as s circumstances change and as a person moves through different stages of their life.

The Mental Health Foundation says: “There’s a stigma attached to mental health problems. This means that people feel uncomfortable about them and don’t talk about them much. Many people don’t even feel comfortable talking about their feelings. But it’s healthy to know and say how you’re feeling.”

According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 264 million people suffer from depression globally. It says that ‘Work is good for mental health but a negative working environment can lead to physical and mental health problems’, and that ‘harassment and bullying at work are commonly reported problems, and can have a substantial adverse impact on mental health.’

The World Health Organization website contains information on Work-related risk factors for health, Creating a healthy workplace and Supporting people with mental disorders at work

The Health & Safety Executive (HSE) says that: “Work can also aggravate pre-existing conditions, and problems at work can bring on symptoms or make their effects worse.

“Whether work is causing the health issue or aggravating it, employers have a legal responsibility to help their employees. Work-related mental health issues must to be assessed to measure the levels of risk to staff. Where a risk is identified, steps must be taken to remove it or reduce it as far as reasonably practicable.

“Some employees will have a pre-existing physical or mental health condition when recruited or may develop one caused by factors that are not work-related factors.

“Employers may have further legal requirements, to make reasonable adjustments under equalities legislation.”

GOV.UK contains all of the relevant information about employing people with a mental or physical disability. Further information can be found from the Equality and Human Rights Commission in EnglandScotland and Wales.

There is advice for line managers to help them support their employees with mental health conditions.

The ‘Thriving at Work’ review

This report, written in 2017 by Lord Stevenson and Paul Farmer (Chief Executive of Mind) was produced on behalf of the government to independently review the role employers can play to better support individuals with mental health conditions in the workplace.

It sets out a framework of ‘core standards’ that employers of all sizes are recommended to follow and put in place within their organisation.

In 2019, Safer Highways launched the first industry benchmarking exercise against the Thriving at Work standards for across the highways sector.

Mental Health Act reform plans set out

In January 2021, the Government announced plans for a reform of the Mental Health Act, making changes to how people are sectioned in England and Wales.

A public consolation on the plans has been opened, with the Mental Health Bill set to be published in 2022.

The government will consult on several proposed changes, including:

  • Introducing statutory ‘advance choice documents’ to enable people to express their wishes and preferences on their care when they are well, before the need arises for them to go into hospital;
  • Implementing the right for an individual to choose a nominated person who is best placed to look after their interests under the act if they aren’t able to do so themselves;
  • Expanding the role of independent mental health advocates to offer a greater level of support and representation to every patient detained under the act;
  • Piloting culturally appropriate advocates so patients from all ethnic backgrounds can be better supported to voice their individual needs;
  • Ensuring mental illness is the reason for detention under the act, and that neither autism nor a learning disability are grounds for detention for treatment of themselves;
  • Improving access to community-based mental health support, including crisis care, to prevent avoidable detentions under the act – this is already underway backed by £2.3 billion a year as part of the NHS Long Term Plan.

Mental health in the workplace statistics UK 2019

According to Mental Health and Work, a report from the Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1 in 6.8 people (around 14%) experience mental health problems in the workplace.

It is also reported by Mental Health Foundation, that nearly 20% of women in fulltime employment suffer from common mental health problem as opposed to just over 10% of full-time employed men.

Mental Health Foundation suggests that around £8 billion per year could be saved by UK business, by incorporating better support of mental health in the workplace.

Click here for the HSE’s annual statistics on work-related stress, depression and anxiety in 2018/19.

Mental health in the workplace UK law

All employers have a general duty to look after the welfare of employees under the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and to assess and manage risk to their staff under Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999.

This includes assessing and minimising the risk of stress-related illness.

The Equality Act 2010 makes it unlawful to discriminate against employees because of a mental or physical disability.

A mental health issue can be considered a disability under the law if all of the following apply:

  • It has a ‘substantial adverse effect’ on the life of an employee (for example, they regularly cannot focus on a task, or it takes them longer to do);
  • It lasts at least 12 months, or is expected to;
  • It affects their ability to do their normal day-to-day activities (for example, interacting with people, following instructions or keeping to set working times).

Mental health in the workplace: Taking care of your employees

Research carried out by Mental health charity, Mind, discovered that:

  • Over one in five people (21%) said they had called in sick to avoid work because of workplace stress;
  • 14% said they quit their job and 42% has thought about quitting due to workplace stress;
  • 30% disagreed with the statement ‘I would feel able to talk openly with my line manager if I was feeling stressed’;
  • 56% of employers said they would like to do more to improve staff wellbeing but don’t feel they have the right training or guidance.

Mind has put together a series of free resources to help employers take care of business.

It also offers a series of training courses and wellbeing booklets.

Mind is official Charity Partner of the Workplace Wellbeing Show.

Mental Health First Aid regulation changes

In November 2019, HSE announced a change to the first aid guidance to include suitable and sufficient mental health training.

According to the guidance, this could include providing information or training for managers and employees, employing occupational health professionals, appointing mental health-trained first aiders and implementing employee support programmes.

Heather Beach, Founder and Managing Director of The Healthy Work Company, says that “Whilst the guidance does not mention the MHFA courses specifically, it does say ‘you might decide that it will be beneficial to have personnel trained to identify and understand symptoms and able to support someone who might be experiencing a mental health issue’.”

Research study on Mental Health First Aid in business launched

The Centre for Mental Health and London South Bank University announced in April 2020 that they are embarking on a study of Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) England training in UK workplaces.

Set to last for three years, the Mental Health First Aid England funded study brings together a group of leading Industry experts chaired by Lord Kamlesh Patel. Its aim is to test out the impact of MHFA England training over the long-term in a range of workplaces across the country.

To find out more about the MHFA training study, click here.

3 ways to a mental health and wellbeing strategy

In the not too distant past, a wellbeing strategy looked like apples in the office, yoga at lunchtime, a cycle to work scheme and gym memberships. Generally, this was run by HR. More recently, due to a culture change in the UK regarding the importance of mental health, some proactive work from Mental Health First Aid England and some senior leaders in health and safety, MHFA joined the suite of wellbeing services any right thinking organisation would offer.

Heather Beach, Founder and Managing Director of The Healthy Work Company, says the three ways to a successful health and wellbeing strategy are:

  1. The top down strategic approach;
  2. A mental health training and awareness strategy only;
  3. Iterative approach.

Mental health: the costs to employees and businesses

financeMental health can affect how we feel, think and behave and, in some cases, seriously limit our ability to cope with relationships, work and life in general.

In the workplace, mental health issues can have a serious impact on both the morale of employees, those suffering from mental health issues and their colleagues who then pick up the additional workload.

It can also impact an organisation’s productivity and profitability through overtime costs, recruitment of temporary or permanent cover – According to the Centre for Mental Health, the financial cost to British business of mental ill-health is an estimated £26 billion per annum, because of absence from work due to mental health issues.

Mental health issues can appear as the result of experiences in both our personal and working lives, or like a physical illness, can just happen. Commonly diagnosed mental health issues include:

  • Depression, anxiety and panic attacks;
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder;
  • Phobias;
  • Bipolar disorder;
  • Schizophrenia;
  • Borderline personality disorder.

The Health & Safety Executive’s draft ‘Health and Work strategy: Work-related stress’ identifies that 1.5% of the working population suffers from mental health issues, resulting in 11.7 million working days lost in 2015/16 (23.9 days/case).

Compare this to self-reported injuries – 4.9M working days lost (7.2 days/case) – and the scale of workplace mental ill-health is almost two and a half times the physical impact of unsafe workplaces and working practices.

Cost to business

Providing support for employees is important for your organisation as well as for the individual concerned.

As well as financial savings, the benefits of such investment for your organisation include:

  • Reducing the costs of lost productivity due to absenteeism;
  • Retaining valued and experienced members of staff – and thus avoiding unnecessary recruitment and training costs;
  • Reducing the cost of sickness absence payments;
  • Meeting your duty of care and legislative obligations;
  • Identifying and managing mental health in the workplace.

One-in-four people will experience a mental health problem in any year. A common misconception is that mental health problems are only caused by ‘home’ issues, so some employers can feel that it’s not appropriate, or their responsibility, to intervene and provide support to employees.

It is more common that the cause of an employee’s mental health problems are a combination of issues relating to both their work and private lives.

A simple example would be an employee suffering from anxiety due to high personal debt, which as well as impacting on their private life may result in the demands of their job now becoming impossible for them to cope with.

Likewise, someone under prolonged work-related stress may find it difficult to enjoy life outside of work, due to working excessive hours or drinking as a way of coping, which in turn has a negative impact on their family and/or personal relationships.

We can also be affected if those close to us experience mental health problems. Mental health problems can affect our physical and mental wellbeing, and may include visible signs (shaking), psychological symptoms (exhaustion) or a combination of both.

It is not uncommon for someone to mask both physical and psychological symptoms to the degree that no one close to them is aware. It’s important to remember that no two people respond or cope in the same way; men are less likely to seek help or talk to family and friends due to historical taboos relating to demonstrating weakness to peers.

A successful approach for organisations to work with their employees to encourage awareness, challenge preconceptions to change the approach and reaction to mental health.

Our approach is always proportional to the type of business, along with the size of an organisation. It may not be reasonable to expect a small employer to provide access to counselling, whereas as large employer may be able to do so.

However, regardless of the size of an organisation the first step is being able to communicate about mental health. This could be through:

  • Delivering mental health awareness training to management teams, with the result of improved employee performance due to a change in manager’s attitude;
  • Analysis of responses to confidential awareness surveys and comparison of absence statistics to inform organisations of the potential scale of mental health issues within their workplace;
  • Developing appropriate policies covering the range of mental health issues likely to occur in the workplace amongst both management and employees, and which makes mental health well-being a priority equal to accident and loss prevention.

All employers can minimise the impact of mental health issues amongst employees, by:

  • Introduction of ‘Wellness Recovery Action Plans’ to support the return to work of employees absent due to mental health issues so that they understand their welfare is as important as their return to work;
  • Developing open two-way communication to minimise uncertainty, and when established working ways are being changed, through tool box talks and mental health awareness moments for meetings;
  • Providing telephone helpline numbers for (i.e. Citizens Advice, The Samaritans and Mind) on noticeboards, newsletters and in payslips.

Finally, it should be noted that people with mental health issues are automatically protected under the disability strand of the Equality Act 2010 twelve months on from the point of diagnosis.

This legislation puts a duty on all employers to make ‘reasonable adjustments’ in the workplace for employees with disabilities – whether they be physical adjustments or management solutions.

Work-related stress

Work-related stress is defined as “a harmful reaction people have to undue pressures and demands in the workplace”.

Workplace mental health issues are often associated with stress. Exposure to high levels of stress at work can cause emotional symptoms such as depression, tearfulness, withdrawal, mood swings, loss of motivation or concentration and behavioural changes such as smoking, drinking, drugs, changes to eating or sleeping habits and nervous behaviour.

Poor employee mental health arising from stress can cost your business time and money in lost productivity and sickness absence.

Burnout

In May 2019, the World Health Organization announced that in the ICD11 (international classification of mental illnesses) there would be a new category of “burnout” as an occupational phenomenon – not a medical condition.

Burnout, is defined as:

“A syndrome conceptualised as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed. It is characterized by three dimensions:

  • Feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion;
  • Increased mental distance from one’s job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one’s job; and
  • Reduced professional efficacy.

Burnout refers specifically to phenomena in the occupational context and should not be applied to describe experiences in other areas of life.”

Mind Matters

In 2019, SHP and The Healthy Work Company will be published a series of videos entitled Mind Matters, featuring people speaking candidly about their personal experiences with mental ill health.

The series featured topics such as:

Mental health guidance for employers

Knowing what you can do as an employer to tackle work-related mental health issues can be tough. The HSE has produced Management Standards for Work Related Stress to help.

This sets out six key areas to look at:

  1. Demand. Workload, work patterns and work environment;
  2. Control. An employee’s say in how they do their job;
  3. Support. Encouragement and resource provision;
  4. Relationships. Promoting positive working and avoiding conflict e.g. bullying/harassment;
  5. Role. Helping employees understand their role and responsibilities;
  6. Change. Management and communication of change.

Practical advice for your workplace

  • Demonstrate good practice. Use a step-by-step risk assessment to assess your workplace;
  • Promote discussion. Promote working in partnership with employees to decide on practical improvements;
  • Focus on underlying causes. Help employees to get to the root cause of stress in the workplace.

Work-related stress and mental health in the workplace resources:

 

Latest mental health articles

When SHP met Louis Theroux…

Hear Louis Theroux’s thoughts on communicating effectively, working in hostile, health and health and wellbeing.

‘There is a need for a common-sense approach to tackling risk’, says film-maker Louis Theroux

Documentary maker, producer and writer Louis Theroux is well known for his relaxed interview style but on the final day of Safety & Health Expo 2022 the tables were turned as he sat down with SHP Editor, Ian Hart in front of a packed Keynote Theatre crowd.

How can employers tackle loneliness?

Alex Minett, Head of Products and Markets at CHAS looks at how employers can tackle this issue as part of the wider mental health agenda.

Mental Health Awareness Week: SME accountancy firm encourages lonely entrepreneurs to reach out

Loneliness is the theme for this year’s Mental Health Awareness Week, something that a third of entrepreneurs have struggled with…

Top tips for preventing loneliness at work

The theme of this year’s Mental Health Awareness Week, which takes place in the UK from 9-15 May, is loneliness. Here, IOSH’s Ryan Exley looks at how to prevent loneliness in the workplace.

Mental Health Awareness Week: Loneliness in the workplace

SHP reports on a special event about overcoming loneliness in the workplace, held at The House of Lords and hosted by The Right Honourable Lord Boateng, in the build-up to Mental Health Awareness Week.

Mental Health Awareness Week: How to avoid loneliness when working from home

In this article, Heather Beach provides some tips on avoiding loneliness when working from home.

Work-related suicide: A Women in Health & Safety webinar

Women in Health & Safety Network is set to host it’s next virtual event, a webinar covering work-related suicide and the reporting data around it. The session will take place on Friday Jun 10 and is open to all, male and female, members and non-members.

Plans put in place to help hospitality businesses recognise the signs of work-related stress

The Burnt Chef Project has joined forces with the Health and Safety Executive’s Working Minds campaign to tackle work-related stress in the hospitality industry.

Should employers be taking a gendered approach to managing stress and mental health?

Philip Crosbie from law firm Eversheds Sutherland considers whether employers should be taking a gendered approach to managing stress and mental health?

‘Brexit Means Brexit’ – How does the UK’s approach to stress and mental health compare to the approach across Europe?

Paul Verrico and Sarah Valentine from law firm Eversheds Sutherland consider how the UK’s approach to stress and mental health compares to the approach across Europe.

Creating a Wellbeing Committee and the benefits it can bring to your business

Mandy Kendrick, HR Manager at Hunter Safety Solutions, talks to SHP about how the introduction of several initiatives within the business, aimed to improve mental health and wellbeing of staff, has led to an increase in engagement throughout the company.

‘We shouldn’t feel as though we have to diminish how we’re feeling because someone, somewhere has things worse’ – Daisy Silcock on the importance of keeping the mental health conversation alive

Daisy Silcock shares her experience dealing with mental health struggles and why this ultimately led her to start her own business. She also discusses what employers can do to help break the stigma surrounding mental health in the workplace. 

Health and safety has never been so visible – could we lose focus in 2022?

Simon Walter, Co-Director at Rhino Safety, shares his thoughts on the role health and safety should play in the workplace in 2022.

Supporting your people to thrive: Leaders’ role in delivering holistic health, safety and wellbeing strategy

Gone are the days when the wellbeing box was ticked by having a fruit bowl next to the coffee machine.

‘35% of employers have not talked to staff about their mental health in the past year’, according to study

Research by Acas has found that over a third of British employers have not talked to their staff about their mental health and wellbeing over the past year.

Evolution of a safety speaker – from motivational to inspirational

Jason Anker speaks about the impact of his traditional safety talk, compared to his latest talk, which has a heavy focus on wellbeing and mental health and how we make different safety choices as a result.

Time to Talk Day: Get the nation talking about mental health

Thursday 3 February marks Time to Talk Day 2022, an initiative from Mind and Rethink Mental Illness, in partnership with Co-op.

Could a four-day working week improve employees mental health and wellbeing?

A trial of a four-day working week has launched in the UK to measure whether employees who work less are more productive and have better mental health.

You have to ask yourself… ‘Do you feel lucky?… Well, do you!?’

Tim Marsh discusses the nature of luck and why individuals and organisations need to pro-actively and systemically work to maximise the chances of enjoying a fair share regarding the human factor.

‘Help Inside the Hard Hat’ awareness campaign set to go on tour

Help Inside the Hard Hat, the latest awareness campaign from the Lighthouse Construction Charity, goes on tour on 7 February for a week.

Mental Health First Aid England urges caution over mandating return to work

MHFA Chief Executive, Simon Blake, says there is ‘no space for a one size fits all approach’ and calls for employers to take a ‘fluid approach to workplace wellbeing’.

Getting your workforce through Blue Monday

As Christmas and New Year celebrations come to an end, many will be feeling the effects of gloomy weather, shorter days, and the debt they’ve run up after the festive break. It’s well known that the third Monday in January is dubbed ‘Blue Monday’, so what can businesses do to boost morale in the workplace and help employees to get through the post-Christmas slump?

‘Simply asking someone to eat more is not going to help and could make the situation a whole lot worse’ – James Knott on his battle with anorexia

SHP recently spoke to Health and Safety Manager at SJ Eastern, James Knott, about his experience battling Anorexia Nervosa.

Women’s health – We need to do more

Danny Clarke, Founder of Simply-People, explores what businesses can do to best support their female employees. 

January Blues: SHP’s guide to helping workers beat the winter slump

The first few weeks of January are often perceived as a challenging time for the workforce from a mental wellbeing perspective.

Prince William shares insight into the “emotional toll” of air ambulance rescues

Speaking in a recent Apple podcast, The Duke of Cambridge discussed the impact working as an air ambulance pilot had on him.

‘How can we be more intentional about our wellbeing?’ – Rob Stephenson discusses the growing need for businesses to retain a focus on workplace wellbeing

SHP summarises the key take-aways from Rob Stephenson’s talk at EHS Congress 2021, which took place from the 9-10 November.

Louise Hosking and Jimmy Quinn on IOSH Presidency and looking ahead to 2022

IOSH President Louise Hosking and IOSH Immediate Past President Jimmy Quinn discuss the challenges of COVID-19 and look ahead to 2022.

‘We’ve got to come together as a profession and it’s extraordinary and exciting’

Louise Hosking officially began her tenure as President of IOSH in November, taking over from Jimmy Quinn, who becomes Immediate Past President. In this article, SHP speaks to both Jimmy and Louise to look back on the last 12 months and to see what’s in store for 2022.

A guide to home working

Many businesses have begun to embrace the idea of flexible working and working from home and, in the current climate, more and more of us may find ourselves plunged into doing so for longer than the one to two days a week, which employers and employees adapt to fairly easily.

Organisations worldwide set to increase investment in employee mental health

According to a report conducted by the International SOS Risk Outlook 2022, organisations worldwide are set to increase investment in employee health.

HSE releases guidance on managing home workers’ health and safety 

According to new guidance from the HSE, employers have the same health and safety responsibilities for people working at home as for any other worker.

HSE publishes guidance on responding to suicide and grief in the workplace

The document points out that employers have a duty of care to workers and to ensuring their health, safety and welfare.

The Duke of Cambridge launches new mental health initiative for emergency responders

Prince William has given a speech to 200 front line workers at The Royal Foundation’s Emergency Services Mental Health Symposium.

HSE launches ‘Working Minds’ campaign to encourage employers to promote good mental health

Work-related stress and poor mental health is becoming a health and safety crisis for Great Britain’s workplaces, the HSE has warned. 

Invisible disabilities in the workplace

Nichola Ebbern shares her personal experience of invisible disabilities in the workplace and provides advice for how employers can support them.

OneWISH announces global live event in support of Stress Awareness Week

OneWISH announces its November live event, bringing together expert speakers, panellists and the latest research within the OHS profession.

Research finds Nordic countries are paving the way for the future of shared parental leave

Research has found 27% of working parents want more flexibility. Director for Mental Health at Bupa, shares the benefits of shared parental leave.

‘Work-related suicides should be monitored and regulated’

In this episode of the Safety & Health Podcast, we are joined by Sarah Waters to look at a study, published by University of Leeds, which calls on the HSE to monitor, regulate and ultimately prevent workplace suicides.

Why is wellbeing important in the workplace?

‘In the past two years, over two thirds of people have experienced a health issue, long-term condition, or disability.’

Understanding employee health concerns…

Benenden Health’s latest research, from surveying over 2,000+ employees and 500+ employers across the UK, uncovers and explores the diverse range of health issues that employees are experiencing right now, or worrying about experiencing in the future, and provides information about the implications of these in the workplace.

Haulage industry urged to take action after 1 in 2 companies report a rise in mental health problems amongst drivers

 A recent study has found that 50% of logistics companies have seen an increase in employee stress, anxiety and other mental health issues.

‘Work-related suicides should be monitored, regulated and prevented,’ SHP meets Prof Sarah Waters 

SHP speaks to Sarah Waters, Professor of French studies at the University of Leeds, who has recently published a report, with Hilda Palmer from Hazards Campaign, looking into 12 suicide cases that occurred between 2015 and 2020 to discover whether they could be attributed to the workplace. 

Are EAPs getting back to basics? Everyday wellbeing, not crises

Vanessa Sallows, Claims and Governance Director for Legal & General Group Protection, looks at 5 ways to make your EAP work smarter.

World Mental Health Day: The importance of nurturing positive psychological health

In aid of World Mental Health Day on Sunday 10 October, SHP caught up with Karl Simons OBE, Executive Director for Health, Safety and Wellbeing at FYLD.

World Mental Health Day: ‘Mental health in an unequal world’

Each year, on 10 October, World Mental Health Day aims to raise awareness of mental health issues around the world and to mobilise efforts in support of mental health. The theme this year is ‘mental health in an unequal world’.

Growing number of senior business leaders speaking out about poor mental health in the workplace  

InsideOut LeaderBoard announces 2021 list of senior leadership role models.

‘The silent pandemic of poor mental health has taken too many people before their time’, Health Secretary tells Global Mental Health Summit

Savid Javid speaks on current government initiatives to promote better mental health in Britain at Global Mental Health Summit 2021.

‘Mental health and wellbeing of employees is definitely further up the agenda’, SHP meets Rob Stephenson

SHP speaks to mental health campaigner and CEO of FormScore, Rob Stephenson, about how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the health and safety profession and what more needs to be done to ensure business’ are doing all they can to maintain ‘mentally healthy’ workplaces. 

How to improve workplace productivity and happiness with the flick of a switch

Managing Director at Eco UK Group, Steve Gardner, explores how lighting can impact workplace productivity.

‘COVID has not just blurred that boundary between work and home, it’s completely eliminated it’, SHP meets Andrew Sharman

Andrew Sharman, CEO of RMS Switzerland and Chair of EHS Congress 2021, talks to SHP about what attendees can expect from this year’s event. 

Over a third of businesses report that employee mental health support has got better since the start of the pandemic

New research by Acas has found that 36% of British employers have seen their mental health support improve since the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

World Suicide Prevention Day 2021: Creating Hope Through Action

Friday 10 September marks World Suicide Prevention Day 2021. The international theme this year is set around ‘Creating Hope Through Action,’ with the focus being on exploring the complicated idea of ‘hope’ in suicide prevention.

How managers can shape ‘healthy hybrid’ working

The destination for many of us is hybrid working. Among the recurring themes has been the central role one particular category of worker will play in ensuring the journey is navigated safely and healthily: the line manager.

ISO 45003: Your questions answered

Your questions from a recent ISO 45003 webinar have been put to BSI Group’s Global Head Health, Safety and Wellbeing, Kate Field.

‘It’s okay not to be okay,’ in conversation with The Mental Health Runner

SHP speaks to Thomas Dunning, Mental Health Runner Director, who was named SHP’s Trailblazer in Positive Social Impact, for 2020.

Depression, burnout and how to talk about mental health at work – My story, by Ann Diment

Ann Diment is Director of Work Safe and Well, transforming burned out professionals into resilient and compassionate leaders. She wants to smash the stigma of talking about mental health, to empower everyone to start those ‘difficult’ conversations so they can become more confident and creative leaders.  

My experience of workplace stress, in an organisation that didn’t see occupational stress as an issue: In conversation with Kate Field

Kate Field has never had a diagnosed mental illness or received medical treatment for her mental health. But like so many, she has certainly suffered with her mental health.

Construction suicide rates on the increase

The Lighthouse Construction Industry Charity commissioned Glasgow Caledonian University to carry out research on suicide statistics from 2015 to 2019 and results show that suicides have increased in construction. 

What makes us susceptible to burnout?

In this episode  of the Safety & Health Podcast, ‘Burnout, stress and being human’, Heather Beach is joined by Stacy Thomson to discuss burnout, perfectionism and how to deal with burnout as an individual, as management and as an organisation.

We provide an insight on how to tackle burnout and why mental health is such a taboo subject, particularly in the workplace.

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stuart Gibbon
stuart Gibbon
4 years ago

Whilst there is a huge plethora of good information on the internet regarding Mental Health & Well-being and what to do to reduce and assist with it , i feel that H&S legislation is falling short on enforcing employers to safe guard employees mental health. It’s ok that section 2 of the HASAWA states that it is the employers duty to safeguard the Health safety & well-being of their employees whilst at work, but why cant we encompass Mental Health First Aid into the standard First Aid at Work Regulations, whereby, based on the risk, diversity and size of an… Read more »

David Whiting
David Whiting
4 years ago
Reply to  stuart Gibbon

Hi Stuart, You make a good point. We have started in my company to introduce trained Mental First Aiders (MFA). To introduce MFA will require a well thought out strategy as it goes to the very heart of how do we do business. Many Health and Safety people see this as an extra task to have to do. For as long as I have been in practice (many years) it has never been at the front of our agenda, but with the means of popular media attention and AI and modern technology. Could be another means to get underneath the… Read more »