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November 22, 2017

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IOSH Conference: ‘No Time to Lose’ campaign progress discussed

NTTL silicaRepresentatives from construction, rail, and mineral products firms have discussed progress on tackling exposure to respirable crystalline silica (RCS) at this year’s IOSH conference.

The discussion, which followed last year’s commitment to tackle cancer caused by RCS under the ‘No Time to Lose’ campaign, included leading professional bodies, academics and businesses.

No Time to Lose aims to raise awareness and understanding of occupational cancer and to help businesses manage the risks through education and the provision of helpful resources.

Silica dust is the second biggest cause of occupational cancer after asbestos. It is released when products such as bricks, tiles and concrete are worked on.

Around the world, millions of employees are exposed to silica dust. In Britain alone, around 800 people die every year from workplace exposure to RCS.

The 2016 commitment aimed to achieve three objectives:

  • To work together to reduce exposure to RCS through effective monitoring and management of dust
  • To increase awareness and understanding of the potential health risks associated with exposure to RCS in order to change attitudes and behaviours
  • To share good practice on the management of RCS across industry sectors.

Shelley Frost, IOSH Director of Strategic Development, said: “It was fantastic to hear about the excellent work partners have done to tackle silica dust at work. There has been some new research, great resources and guidance, and case studies discussed in today’s session.

“We also talked about innovative ideas to move the work forward, which we’ll be developing plans around.

“We’re currently compiling a report on all the progress made by partners and will be communicating this soon through our various channels.”

 

Sleep and Fatigue: Director’s Briefing

Fatigue is common amongst the population, but particularly among those working abnormal hours, and can arise from excessive working time or poorly designed shift patterns. It is also related to workload, in that workers are more easily fatigued if their work is machine-paced, complex or monotonous.

This free director’s briefing contains:

  • Key points;
  • Recommendations for employers;
  • Case law;
  • Legal duties.
Barbour EHS

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